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Moderate Calisthenics: A Simple Guide For Beginners

Thanks to lockdowns and gym closures, the calisthenics movement is going from strength to strength.

Here’s everything you need to know about moderate calisthenics.

What Is Moderate Calisthenics?

Moderate calisthenics is a type of resistance training that uses your own bodyweight to gain size and strength. Moderate calisthenics is considered to be medium difficulty, so is ideal for people who have some experience with resistance training.

In this article, we cover some classic moderate calisthenics exercises, whether beginners should do moderate calisthenics, how many calories moderate calisthenics burns, and much more!

4 Epic Moderate Calisthenics Exercises

Standard Push Ups

  1. Start on all fours with your legs straight and your hands shoulder-width apart.
  2. Next, bend your arms so that your chest approaches the floor.
  3. As your chest approaches the floor, pause for 2 seconds.
  4. Finally, push yourself back up so that you return to the starting position.

Standard Pull Ups

  1. Start by gripping a pull up/overhead bar with your palms facing away from you and your hands at shoulder width apart.
  2. Next, lift your feet off the ground and pull yourself up vertically so that your arms are at 90-degree angles and that your chin is in line with the bar.
  3. When your chin is in line with the bar, pause for a second.
  4. Finally, slowly lower yourself down so that you return to the starting position with your feet off the ground.

Standard Chin Ups

  1. Start by gripping a pull up/overhead bar with your palms facing towards you and your hands at shoulder width apart.
  2. Next, lift your feet off the ground and pull yourself up vertically so that your chin touches the bar.
  3. When your chin is touching the bar, pause for a second.
  4. To finish the move, slowly lower yourself down so that your arms are fully extended.

Slow Bodyweight Squats

  1. Start with your arms straightened out parallel to the floor with your feet shoulder-width apart.
  2. As you squat down, keep your core tightened and push your weight back into your heels while pushing your hips back.
  3. Over the course of 5 seconds, slowly yourself until your quads are parallel to the floor, with your knees inline with your toes.
  4. When your quads are parallel to the floor, hold the position for 5 seconds.
  5. Finally, over the course of 5 seconds, push through your heels until you return to the starting position.

Is Moderate Calisthenics Good For Beginners?

If you have no experience with calisthenics, but you regularly do weight training, then you should be able to manage moderate calisthenics.

However, if you’ve never done any forms of resistance training, you should stick to light calisthenics to begin with.

Once you’ve mastered light calisthenics, you can then progress to moderate.

Do You Need Any Equipment To Do Moderate Calisthenics?

You need equipment for some moderate calisthenics exercises, but you can do most with just a floor and your body.

For example, standard pull ups and chin ups will require a pull up/overhead bar, but you can perform standard push ups and slow bodyweight squats anywhere.

(Don’t worry if you don’t have a pull up bar – they’re pretty cheap on Amazon.)

Can You Do Moderate Calisthenics At Home?

You betcha!

One of the best things about moderate calisthenics is that it can be done absolutely anywhere.

And the great news is that pull up bars can be fitted onto your door frame, so you can do a full moderate calisthenics workout in the comfort of your living room!

Can Anyone Do Moderate Calisthenics?

Short answer – no.

Since it’s medium difficulty, I wouldn’t recommend moderate calisthenics for those who have no experience with resistance training.

Why?

Well, you’re much more likely to get injured if you attempt an exercise that’s beyond your capability.

Can You Do Moderate Calisthenics At The Gym?

I know that some people find it hard to get motivated when it comes to home workouts.

Well if that’s you, you’ll be pleased to know that yes – you can do moderate calisthenics at the gym.

Doing it at the gym means you won’t have to buy a pull up bar too!

Can You Do Moderate Calisthenics Every Day?

You can do moderate calisthenics every day, as long as you keep the volume to a minimum.

For example, you could do standard pull ups every day, as long as you don’t exceed 3 sets of 10 reps.

The reason being, you need to give your body time to recover.

And the more volume you do, the more your muscles need to recover.

So if you were to do a high volume moderate calisthenics workout every day, your muscles wouldn’t have the time to fully repair.

How Many Calories Do Moderate Calisthenics Burn?

The average woman can expect to burn around 150 calories from a 30-minute moderate calisthenics session.

Whereas the average man can expect to burn around 170 calories from a 30-minute moderate calisthenics session.

(These estimates are calculated from captaincalculator.com)

Why Should You Do Moderate Calisthenics?

Moderate Calisthenics Is A Great Stepping-Stone To Vigorous Calisthenics

Some people start moderate calisthenics with goal of being able to do vigorous calisthenics.

Being able to do a one-arm pull up is soooo much easier to do once you’ve mastered a standard pull up.

Likewise, being able to do a diamond push up is a lot easier once you’ve mastered a standard push up.

Moderate Calisthenics Work Many Muscles Simultaneously

The beauty of moderate calisthenics is that it focuses on compound movements.

These are exercises which work many muscles at once.

For example, standard chin ups are great for you back and biceps.

Whereas slow bodyweight squats help develop both your quads and hamstrings.

By leveraging compound movements, you can do more in less time!

A win-win in my eyes.

Moderate Calisthenics Workout Example

Here’s an epic moderate calisthenics routine to get you started.

Once you’ve done each exercise, rest for 90 seconds to complete the circuit, and then repeat the circuit another 4 times.

Exercise 1: Slow Bodyweight Squats (for 2 minutes)

Exercise 2: Standard Pull Ups (for 1 minute)

Exercise 3: Standard Push Ups (for 1 minute)

Exercise 4: Slow Bodyweight Squats (2 minutes)

Exercise 5: Standard Chin Ups (1 minute)

Exercise 6: Standard Push Ups (for 1 minute)

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